Archive for November 6th, 2007

The funny side of the law

Tuesday, November 6, 2007

I have no idea where my source for these lists got the information from, but it’s irresistible. Percentages in brackets refer to votes cast for the ten most daft laws in the UK, and nine laws from other countries –

Recently the UK’s top 10 most ridiculous British laws were listed as:

  1. It is illegal to die in the Houses of Parliament (27%)
  2. It is an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the British king or queen’s image upside-down (7%)
  3. It is illegal for a woman to be topless in Liverpool except as a clerk in a tropical fish store (6%)
  4. Eating mince pies on Christmas Day is banned (5%)
  5. If someone knocks on your door in Scotland and requires the use of your toilet, you are required to let them enter (4%)
  6. In the UK a pregnant woman can legally relieve herself anywhere she wants, including in a policeman’s helmet (4%)
  7. The head of any dead whale found on the British coast automatically becomes the property of the King, and the tail of the Queen (3.5%)
  8. It is illegal not to tell the tax man anything you do not want him to know, but legal not to tell him information you do not mind him knowing (3%)
  9. It is illegal to enter the Houses of Parliament wearing a suit of armour (3%)
  10. It is legal to murder a Scotsman within the ancient city walls of York, but only if he is carrying a bow and arrow (2%)

[…] Other bizarre foreign laws voted by those polled included:

  • In Ohio, it is illegal to get a fish drunk (9%)
  • In Indonesia, the penalty for masturbation is decapitation (8%)
  • A male doctor in Bahrain can only examine the genitals of a woman in the reflection of a mirror (7%)
  • In Switzerland, a man may not relieve himself standing up after 10pm (6%)
  • It is illegal to be blindfolded while driving a vehicle in Alabama (6%)
  • In Florida, unmarried women who parachute on a Sunday could be jailed (6%)
  • Women in Vermont must obtain written permission from their husbands to wear false teeth (6%)
  • In Milan, it is a legal requirement to smile at all times, except during funerals or hospital visits (5%)
  • In France, it is illegal to name a pig Napoleon (4%)

Update (7.11)

Aah – the original source for the info is old Auntie herself, the BBC.

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Hands up, who’s turning a blind eye to biofuels?!

Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Monbiot claims that biofuels could kill more people than the Iraq war. Here’s how his article opens –

It doesn’t get madder than this. Swaziland is in the grip of a famine and receiving emergency food aid. Forty per cent of its people are facing acute food shortages. So what has the government decided to export? Biofuel made from one of its staple crops, cassava(1). The government has allocated several thousand hectares of farmland to ethanol production in the county of Lavumisa, which happens to be the place worst hit by drought(2). It would surely be quicker and more humane to refine the Swazi people and put them in our tanks. Doubtless a team of development consultants is already doing the sums.

This is one of many examples of a trade described last month by Jean Ziegler, the UN’s special rapporteur, as “a crime against humanity”(3). Ziegler took up the call first made by this column for a five-year moratorium on all government targets and incentives for biofuel(4): the trade should be frozen until second-generation fuels – made from wood or straw or waste – become commercially available. Otherwise the superior purchasing power of drivers in the rich world means that they will snatch food from people’s mouths. Run your car on virgin biofuel and other people will starve.

Even the International Monetary Fund, always ready to immolate the poor on the altar of business, now warns that using food to produce biofuels “might further strain already tight supplies of arable land and water all over the world, thereby pushing food prices up even further.”(5) This week the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation will announce the lowest global food reserves in 25 years, threatening what it calls “a very serious crisis”(6). Even when the price of food was low, 850 million people went hungry because they could not afford to buy it. With every increment in the price of flour or grain, several million more are pushed below the breadline.

The cost of rice has risen by 20% over the past year, maize by 50%, wheat by 100%(7). Biofuels aren’t entirely to blame – by taking land out of food production they exacerbate the effects of bad harvests and rising demand – but almost all the major agencies are now warning against expansion. And almost all the major governments are ignoring them.

For the rest of the article and footnotes, read here. So where are the systemic analyses? If only a low-impact, laboratory-based refining method could be created and quickly scaled up…